Tag Archives: HVAC

High-rise living, low-energy lifestyle

Tall-building developments in Toronto are outpacing every other city in North America, with roughly 44 high-rises exceeding the 150-m 
(492-ft) mark—more than triple the 13 skyscrapers gracing the city’s skyline in 2005. The dramatic increase in office and living space pointed to epic levels of energy use, capturing the attention of Canadian legislators.

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Introducing energy recovery ventilation

Current Canadian projects indicate energy recovery ventilators (ERVs) are not a fad, but the wave of the future. One project putting this type of HVAC technology on the ‘sustainability map’ is the Montréal-based Centre hospitalier de l’Université de Montréal (CHUM). CHUM’s 185,810-m2 (2-million-sf) expansion (pictured above) makes it one of the largest hospitals in North America.

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NAFA honours 32 recipients with clean air awards

The National Air Filtration Association (NAFA) has announced the winners of its 2015 Clean Air Awards. The award is presented each year to building owners and managers in Canada and the United States that take the steps to significantly improve indoor air quality (IAQ) by increasing the level or efficiency of the HVAC air filtration system in 10 specific categories.

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Human-centred Design: Simplifying features in building automation

At the most basic level, a building automation system (BAS) helps reduce operating costs and equipment replacement capital costs by only running systems when they are needed. For example, facility professionals could use a BAS to raise air-conditioner set-points or turn off the system in college dorm rooms in Toronto in the spring and summer, or lower heating set points in Edmonton commercial office buildings on winter weekends.

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Designing fabric duct ventilation

A decade ago, designing the esthetics of an exposed ventilation system in open architectural ceiling applications began with colour, material, and dispersion method selection. The suspension or top end of the ventilation system was the least esthetic concern—it was typically the last choice, or just an after-thought in the process.

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