A framework for climate resilient performance standard of commercial roofs

The National Research Council Canada (NRC) is working to integrate climate resiliency into building and infrastructure design, guides, and codes. In this article, the authors present a framework for climate-resilient design of commercial roofs that will become part of the Canadian Standards Association (CSA) A123.26, Performance Requirements for Climate Resilience of Low Slope Membrane Roofing Systems.

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BILCO doors protect pumps, help Virginia community solve water issues

The Hampton Roads region in eastern Virginia, United States, faces challenging issues with water quality and land subsidence, but a new project is helping to provide a sustainable source of groundwater.A central part of the system is specialty access doors manufactured by the BILCO Company of Connecticut. The doors protect pumps and vaults in the complex system, and play a vital role in protecting water and other matter from infiltrating the system.

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Tools of the Trade: Designing to reduce a building’s embodied carbon

The carbon footprint of the design and construction industry reaches far beyond the boundaries of a single building or site. Due to various processes, ranging from the extraction of raw materials to manufacturing and installation of the construction materials, the impact of a single project includes both embodied carbon within the built environment and operational carbon generated throughout the life cycle of the structure. Embodied carbon is defined as the carbon dioxide (CO2) emitted during the full life cycle of a product from extraction (cradle) to the use and disposal phases (grave).

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The detrimental effects of UV on barriers

Water-resistive barriers (WRBs) play a vital role in the performance of a wall system. Unfortunately, barriers can be undermined even before they clad the walls due to ultraviolet (UV) exposure. Understanding and minimizing the impact of UV on WRB is critical to ensuring the integrity of the wall assembly and building performance for years.

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Theory of a self-drying roof

Roof enclosures have the largest litigation potential in the construction industry due to complexities in design, application, and environmental exposure. A self-drying roof enclosure would minimize the litigation potential and provide additional benefits, such as increased roof resiliency, reduced financial burden, and minimal impact on the environment.

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