Four projects celebrated in Canadian awards for public-private partnerships

December 13, 2016

The Oakville Trafalgar Memorial Hospital’s innovative use of architecture and technology earned it the Gold award in infrastructure for the Canadian Council for Public-private Partnerships’ (CCPPP’s) 2016 National Awards for Excellence in Public-private Partnerships (P3s). Images courtesy CNW Group and the Canadian Council for Public-private Partnerships[1]
The Oakville Trafalgar Memorial Hospital’s innovative use of architecture and technology earned it the Gold award in infrastructure for the Canadian Council for Public-private Partnerships’ (CCPPP’s) 2016 National Awards for Excellence in Public-private Partnerships (P3s).
Images courtesy CNW Group and the Canadian Council for Public-private Partnerships

At the 24th annual Canadian Council for Public-private Partnerships[2] (CCPPP) National Conference last month, awards were presented to the winners of the 2016 National Awards for Innovation and Excellence in Public-private Partnerships (P3s). Five winners[3] in total were celebrated, under four categories: infrastructure, project development, service delivery, and project financing.

Infrastructure
Two projects were rewarded for P3 excellence in infrastructure, winning silver and gold respectively.

New Oakville Trafalgar Memorial Hospital
A replacement for a legacy hospital in Oakville, Ont.—the New Oakville Trafalgar Memorial Hospital—earned the Gold Award in the infrastructure category. The project cost $2 billion and garnered total savings of $383.1 million.

The completed hospital can accommodate 457 inpatient beds, with space for an additional 602 in the future. The awards panel took particular note of the hospital’s dual role as an economic stimulant and centre for medical excellence, as well as its innovative architecture, up-to-date technology, and incorporation of community input.

“The new Oakville Trafalgar Memorial Hospital is a wonderful example of how P3s help build and grow healthy, safe, accessible communities,” says Mark Romoff, president and CEO of CCPPP. “Public-private partnerships have been used to build or redevelop 90 healthcare and treatment facilities across Canada over the past two decades. The innovations in their design and operations not only provide value for the money invested in the project, those innovations support improved patient care and experience.”

The Meadows, Swift Current Long-term Care Centre
The infrastructure category’s Silver Award went to the Meadows—a long-term care centre in Swift Current, Sask. The province’s first P3 project, the centre replaced three older facilities in the region, expanding on available space for long-term and palliative care.

The Meadows had a total project cost of $108.5 million, and provided savings of $16.5 million. It demonstrates several of the primary benefits of P3 projects, including cost and time savings and innovative design, and appealed to the awards panel with its family-focused ‘human’ design, integration of inter-generational elements, and involvement of local contractors and community.

The Women’s College Hospital redevelopment project was awarded Silver in the project development category. The only independent academic ambulatory care hospital in Ontario, the facility was restructured to focus around clinical ‘neighbourhoods’ rather than rooms.[4]
The Women’s College Hospital redevelopment project was awarded Silver in the project development category. The only independent academic ambulatory care hospital in Ontario, the facility was restructured to focus around clinical ‘neighbourhoods’ rather than rooms.

Project development
The Silver Award for project development was granted to the Women’s College Hospital redevelopment project in Toronto. The hospital, which is structured around clinical ‘neighbourhoods’ integrating treatment, research, and education rather than a traditional room structure, is the only independent academic ambulatory care hospital in Ontario. It is also the only hospital in the province with a primary focus on women’s health.

The awards panel was particularly impressed with the hospital’s integration of clinical and surgical research with educational facilities, and with the community’s extensive involvement in project design. The hospital’s new design allows for a 70 per cent increase in patient visits, and features a two-phased approach that enables physical sitework to take place without interrupting continued hospital operation.

“The successful development and construction of the new Women’s College Hospital building represents the culmination of many people’s tremendous effort and commitment,” says Marilyn Emery, the hospital’s president and CEO. “Our new building will enable our researchers and clinicians to work side-by-side to find solutions to some of our most pressing health system challenges, provide exemplary care to our diverse patient community and close the health gaps in care that exist for many of them. This award is truly an honour and we are pleased to share it with all our partners.”

The Silver Award in service delivery was granted to Ontario’s Forensic Services and Coroner’s Complex for its use of P3 to motivate service improvements.[5]
The Silver Award in service delivery was granted to Ontario’s Forensic Services and Coroner’s Complex for its use of P3 to motivate service improvements.

Service delivery
Toronto’s Forensic Services and Coroner’s Complex (FSCC) was given the Silver Award in the service delivery category. A judicial inquiry into pediatric forensic pathology, which identified a need for updated and consolidated facilities, prompted the development of this complex, which houses the Office of the Chief Coroner, the Ontario Forensics Pathology Service, the Centre of Forensic Sciences, and the Office of the Fire Marshal and Emergency Management.

This 61,595-m2 (663,000-sf) facility also accommodates laboratories and courtrooms, which can be used to enhance the quality of evidence used in investigations. It cost a total of $497 million, yielding savings of $111.5 million, and appealed to the awards panel with its innovative approach to facilities management and use of the P3 model to motivate superior service.

Project financing
The Gold Award in the project financing category was earned by the southwest Calgary ring road, which consists of 31 km (19 mi) of freeway. This project, with its combination of new and existing infrastructure, plays a significant role in completing the Calgary Ring Road corridor.

The project cost $1.4 billion, yielding savings of $700 million. The awards panel gave particular notice to the ring road’s balance of old and new, and to its successful and innovative method of risk allocation.

Endnotes:
  1. [Image]: http://www.constructioncanada.net/wp-content/uploads/2016/12/20161108_C8791_PHOTO_EN_813816.jpg
  2. Canadian Council for Public-private Partnerships: https://www.pppcouncil.ca/
  3. winners: http://www.pppcouncil.ca/web/Awards/Winners/Latest_Winners/web/Awards/National_Award_Winners.aspx?hkey=28eef21c-7331-4aa8-b83e-c5ed38c230c8
  4. [Image]: http://www.constructioncanada.net/wp-content/uploads/2016/12/20161108_C1442_PHOTO_EN_813850.jpg
  5. [Image]: http://www.constructioncanada.net/wp-content/uploads/2016/12/20161108_C5417_PHOTO_EN_813818.jpg

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