Ottawa student wins AIA design competition

Carleton University student Justin Yan’s adaptive reuse project wins the INNOVATION 2030/Committee on the Environment (COTE) Top Ten for Students design competition.
Photo courtesy Association of Collegiate Schools of Architecture

A Carleton University student is one of the winners of the INNOVATION 2030/Committee on the Environment (COTE) Top Ten for Students design competition. The winning projects embraced this year’s challenge of carbon-neutral design while also addressing climate change adaptability and resilience in the built environment.

Justin Yan’s project, “City Centre Glassworks: An Adaptive Reuse Workshop and Experimentation Facility,” utilizes the heat from glass making to warm the building and save on energy, according to the jurors. The buildings programs and systems are well designed and tailored for each other. An example of this is the rising mist, created from residual heat, bringing an element of delight to the project. The architectural exploration is plausible and grounded in reality, said the jurors.

Sheryl Boyle and Claudio Sgarbi of Carleton University were the faculty sponsors of this project.

More than 1000 students and faculty, representing 56 schools of architecture, participated in this year’s competition, presented by American Institute of Architects (AIA) COTE and Association of Collegiate Schools of Architecture (ACSA) in special collaboration with Architecture 2030 and Design Intelligence.

The award-winning projects will be displayed and presented during a panel discussion on June 21 at the 2018 AIA Conference on Architecture at the Jacob K. Javits Convention Center in New York City. Additionally, a roundtable discussion about INNOVATION 2030 and design education, featuring the winning faculty members, will be held at the Design Futures Council (DFC) 2018 Leadership Forum on Education and Talent on June 20 in New York City.

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