Tag Archives: Glass

Glazing technology promises greater architectural freedom

One of the strategies employed by architects to increase (or regain lost) glazing area to meet the performance objectives of building energy codes and standards involves using established building envelope elements such as window louvres, fins, and shelves, along with emerging technologies such as vacuum-insulated glazing and panels (VIGs) and electrochromic (EC) glass.

+ Read More

Cutting through the smoke

For decades, the words ‘design flexibility’ and ‘fire-rated glass’ would not have appeared in the same sentence. Traditional polished wired glass was the only glazing material permitted in fire-rated areas. Its network of wires holds together broken glass during a fire to slow the spread of flames and smoke longer than was previously possible with other available glazing products.

+ Read More

Fire & Glass, Safety & Style: Specifying advanced fire-rated glazing

The trend to maximize the harnessing of natural daylight combined with environmentally responsible artificial lighting is increasing use of glass within interior spaces since it allows light to spread throughout the building. Glass also has the added benefit of providing clear vision between spaces, creating a sense of openness, connectivity, and security. However, what about separations or partitions that must meet fire-rated requirements?

+ Read More

Expanding laminated glass performance

The capabilities of laminated glass performance have expanded thanks to the introduction of stiff, structural polymer interlayers. This means reduced overall pane thickness and weight, improved durability of exposed laminate edges in exterior applications, and better post-glass breakage performance in minimally supported glazing systems.

+ Read More

The evolution of glazing in Vancouver

When looking at its skyline, it is no wonder why Vancouver is known as the “City of Glass.” Glass high-rise buildings, each one taller than the next, have been the architectural vision developed over many years (Figure 1). In fact, the relationship between West Coast architecture and glazing systems is symbiotic; their evolution would not have been possible without one another.

+ Read More