Reduced-carbon concrete amps up Calgary airport’s green credentials

A major deicing pad at the Calgary International Airport uses sustainable concrete to reduce carbon dioxide (CO2). Photo courtesy CNW Group/CarbonCure Technologies
A major deicing pad at the Calgary International Airport uses sustainable concrete to reduce carbon dioxide (CO2).
Photo courtesy CNW Group/CarbonCure Technologies

The East Deicing Apron, a new deicing pad at the Calgary International Airport (YYC), has been built with reduced-carbon concrete. The first airplanes started using the facility just weeks ago.

More than 25,000 m3 (882,867cf) of the concrete was poured for the construction of the East Deicing Apron project.

The amount of concrete poured to build the East Deicing Apron was the second largest in a single project, and the largest quantity to be used at a Canadian airport.

The manufacturer injects waste carbon dioxide (CO2) captured by industrial gas suppliers into the concrete during mixing, enabling the production of stronger, more sustainable concrete. According to the manufacturer, every cubic metre of concrete made with this technology reduces an average of 16 kg (35 lb) of carbon emissions, meaning an average high-rise built with this concrete would save approximately 120 tonnes of CO2 emissions.

“As YYC strives to be a leader in airport sustainability, we fully supported our airline partners in the decision to inject captured carbon into the new East Deicing Apron’s concrete pavement,” said Carmelle Hunka, vice-president, risk and compliance of the Calgary Airport Authority.

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