Tale of Parliamentary restoration wins Browne award for best article

May 29, 2018

The natural stone façade of the Parliament Buildings effectively demonstrated architectural distinction by incorporating texture and a strong sense of definition, accomplished in part by careful stone selection and expert placement around windows, doors, and entranceways. In this photograph, a masonry worker ensures proper placement and fitting of a masonry unit cleaned using innovative laser technology. Photo courtesy Public Works Canada.[1]
The natural stone façade of the Parliament Buildings effectively demonstrated architectural distinction by incorporating texture and a strong sense of definition, accomplished in part by careful stone selection and expert placement around windows, doors, and entranceways. In this photograph, a masonry worker ensures proper placement and fitting of a masonry unit cleaned using innovative laser technology.
Photo courtesy Public Works Canada.

The F. Ross Browne Award recognizes editorial excellence in Construction Canada. It was presented this year to Brian Burton for “Parliamentary Privileges, The Past and Future of the Houses on the Hill.”

This cover story for the July 2017 issue[2] was selected by the magazine’s editorial board, and commended for its clarity and depth of knowledge. The article discusses the ongoing remediation of the natural stone façade and fenestration of the Parliament Buildings, mixing in a colorful dose of history. According to Burton, the design professionals working on the original Parliament Buildings expected to use “a great deal of dimensioned stone, envisioning a façade comprising approximately 50,000 masonry units, as well as more than 500 windows and door/entrance assemblies.”

Burton is a writer, certified construction inspector, and member of the Association for Preservation Technology.

The award was announced at the recent CSC annual conference in Edmonton. It is named for F. Ross Browne, a former columnist and staunch supporter of CSC. Browne was passionate about effective communication, and known for speaking his mind. He brought this attitude to a column called Curmudgeon’s Corner, which appeared in Construction Canada from July 1998 to Nov. 1999.

Endnotes:
  1. [Image]: https://www.constructioncanada.net/wp-content/uploads/2018/05/ParliamentaryPhoto2.jpg
  2. cover story for the July 2017 issue: https://www.constructioncanada.net/publications/de/201707/index.html

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