An indoor rink for New Brunswick Island

The indoor ice rink at the Grand Manan Community Centre is the first in the island village. In addition to the arena, the facility includes a fitness centre, office space, and a daycare. Photos courtesy Butler Manufacturing
The indoor ice rink at the Grand Manan Community Centre is the first in the island village. In addition to the arena, the facility includes a fitness centre, office space, and a daycare. Photos courtesy Butler Manufacturing

By Kevin Hutchings
The 2400 residents of Grand Manan Island, located in the Bay of Fundy, are now able to skate year-round on the community’s first indoor ice rink funded by government and the community.

The $1.2-million project was included as part of a $4.4-million phased development, which began in 2008. The work also included:

  • renovation and expansion to the existing Boys and Girls Club;
  • daycare;
  • fitness centre; and
  • village offices.

From bringing building materials over on a ferry, to finding enough labourers for constructing the facility, the process was challenging.

The Grand Manan facility was tendered as a systems construction project from the outset. The cost savings and building efficiencies achievable with systems construction played a key role in this decision.

The building’s clear-span framing system provided the design flexibility needed to accommodate its numerous functions and was particularly useful in facilitating wide-open spaces required by the gymnasium and ice rink.

A standing-seam roof system was used on the building for a total of 3994 m2 (43,000 sf). It acts as a monolithic surface covering the entire facility. The roofing system was specified for its low maintenance and long lifespan. It is also able to accommodate additional insulation for improved energy efficiency, while the roof’s movement (as a result of changing temperatures) is dealt with via movable clips. Staggered panel splices also protect vulnerable areas on the roof, while weathertight roof curbs are achieved through use of interior fasteners.

Some investment was made from the government for this project, while the community’s 2400 residents were able to raise additional funds needed.
Some investment was made from the government for this project, while the community’s 2400 residents were able to raise additional funds needed.

The exterior façade’s wall system also provides a tight envelope contributing to the overall energy efficiency of the building. Panel widths are 914 mm (36 in.), and 36.5-mm (1 7/16-in.) corrugations provide strength to resist billowing when fasteners are installed. A uniform appearance is created by the wall system’s recessed fasteners. Additionally, the wall system required the use of 33 per cent fewer fasteners, lowing installation costs and reducing heat loss. Its factory-punched panels and structural members also ensure proper fit and alignment.

Following the rink’s completion in 2010, Mars Canada Inc., and Hockey Canada equipped the facility with a heated viewing mezzanine for spectators as part of the Play Your Part campaign.

Kevin Hutchings has been the training manager for Butler Manufacturing for 15 years and is responsible for product, builder management, and sales training. He joined Butler as an order technician for the buildings division and in the retrofit roof group, where he gained substantial experience in metal roof design and detailing. Hutchings has also served as project services manager for the roof division of Butler, managing a number of large and complex retrofit roof projects. Hutchings can be contacted at jkhutchings@butlermfg.com.

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