All posts by sadia_badhon

Montréal condo combines the old and new

Downtown Montréal’s new condo project, Enticy, will combine the old and new to match its surroundings. Photo courtesy Enticy
Downtown Montréal’s new condo project, Enticy, will combine the old and new to match its surroundings.
Photo courtesy Enticy

Enticy, a new boutique condo project, is coming soon to downtown Montréal. The 24-storey tower combines old and new, with a contemporary design built around a façade of historical townhouses.

The project team includes financial partner Claridge, builders Omnia Technologies, and architects Geiger Huot.

Inspired by the modern and minimalist style of a boutique hotel, Enticy condos will have natural light, views of the Montréal skyline and Saint-Lawrence River. Some of the project’s amenities include a heated rooftop pool and patio, a gym, and appliances included in every unit. Enticy includes 185 condo units (studio and one and two bedrooms) and townhouses located on the ground floor.

CSC Toronto holds annual building expo

The CSC’s 41st Building Expo is taking place on February 27. This year’s theme is construction, connectivity, and wellness. The event will be held at the Metro Toronto Convention Centre’s south building from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m.

The building expo is Canada’s longest running technical trade show for architects, designers, developers, engineers, facility managers, specification writers, and construction professionals. At the luncheon, Dr. Rick Huijbregts, vice-president of strategy and innovation at George Brown College will discuss “Construction in Today’s Connected World”. There will also be a tradeshow and lecture series with other industry speakers.

For more information, click here.

Public input will guide new Ottawa library design

The national engagement process for the design of the new Ottawa Public Library and Library and Archives Canada joint facility has begun. Photo courtesy Ottawa Central Library
The national engagement process for the design of the new Ottawa Public Library and Library and Archives Canada joint facility has begun.
Photo courtesy Ottawa Central Library

The City of Ottawa, Ottawa Public Library, and Library and Archives Canada are asking the public to help inspire the design of the new Ottawa Public Library and Library and Archives Canada joint facility.

Diamond Schmitt Architects and Ottawa’s KWC Architects will design the facility.

The national engagement process for the architectural design of the facility has been labelled the ‘Inspire555 Series,’ in a nod to its address: 555 Albert Street, in downtown Ottawa.

The series is part of an ongoing engagement program for the new destination that began in 2013, and will continue through 2019 as people guide the facility’s design.

The Inspire555 Series will include design workshops, pop-up events, expert lectures, online activities and engagement (local and national), and knowledge sharing with Indigenous communities.

The public will have the opportunity to view preliminary outlines, share ideas regarding how to make the most of the panoramic views, and inform the physical orientation of the building. Along with in-person workshops, Canadians will be invited to share their thoughts and input online.

Ontario city ‘living lab’ for IoT applications

The City of Markham plans to use Internet of Things (IoT) applications to improve efficiency of municipal operations. Photo © www.bigstockphoto.com
The City of Markham plans to use Internet of Things (IoT) applications to improve efficiency of municipal operations.
Photo © www.bigstockphoto.com

The City of Markham, Ont., has launched the Smart City Accelerator Research Program, in partnership with a telecommunications firm. The program will deploy several Internet of Things (IoT) applications to improve the efficiency of municipal operations and enhance city services for residents.

Markham aims to create a ‘frictionless city’ through innovation and adoption of emerging technologies that will better the overall quality of life for its residents. The initiative provides an opportunity for the city to test various sensor technologies in different business areas.

“Markham will serve as a living lab and an incubator for innovation,” said Frank Scarpitti, mayor of Markham.

Data analytics gathered by the system would enable municipal workers from across city departments to collaborate in real-time and can lead to better-informed decisions about the management of city operations and delivery of services for citizens.

Planned initiatives for the smart city program include:

  • asset management (remote tracking of usage and location of municipal equipment);
  • water leak detection (sensors on water mains and hydrants to provide real-time status of water system conditions);
  • storm/flood water monitoring (manhole and river sensors measure water levels to help manage flood risk and mitigate damage);
  • environmental monitoring (temperature and humidity sensors from fixed locations across the city will provide weather data to guide decisions on management of city operations); and
  • energy management (sensors will monitor and support analysis of energy usage in municipal buildings to optimize energy management).

Grand Valley Chapter hosts seminar on underslab membrane

On February 20, the CSC Grand Valley will have a luncheon seminar on “Selecting the Correct Underslab Membrane” at the Grand Valley Construction Association. A networking session will take place from 11:30 a.m. to 12 p.m., followed by lunch and presentation from noon to 1:30 p.m.

The presenter Russell Snow (W.R. Meadows), CSP, CTR, BSSO, LEED AP, will address the origin of various contaminants and their effects on concrete floor slabs, along with differentiating underslab moisture and gas barriers. Additionally, specific materials for providing complete underslab protection and their installation details will be discussed.

Click here for more information.

Custom acoustic panels enhance Montréal restaurant’s atmosphere

Custom acoustic panels enhanced the atmosphere in Brasserie Bernard, a Parisian-style restaurant in Montréal. Photo courtesy pinta acoustic
Custom acoustic panels enhanced the atmosphere in Brasserie Bernard, a Parisian-style restaurant in Montréal.
Photo courtesy pinta acoustic

Brasserie Bernard, a Parisian-style restaurant in Montréal, used lightweight, direct-apply acoustic panels to develop an atmosphere suitable for comfortable communication.

In addition to providing acoustic benefits, the custom golden-yellow panels harmonize with the multidimensionally painted ceiling and walls, and contrast with the black wood and leather banquettes.

“Once installed, we noticed a significant difference,” said Maurice Holder, co-owner of the restaurant. “It became more comfortable for our patrons and employees to converse.”

The restaurant has hardwood floors, oversized mirrors, and dark wood pillars topped with contrasting golden-yellow tiles. Without an acoustical treatment, hard surfaces in a space would reflect sound energy. Excessive sound builds up and produces higher levels of background noise. This often results in people speaking louder, making it even more difficult to have an enjoyable conversation.

Approximately 56 m2 (600 sf) of the 204-m2 (2200-sf) dining area received acoustic treatment with 600 x 600 mm (24.62 x 23.62 in.), 50-mm (2-in.) thick custom panels finished with a specially formulated water-based, golden-yellow acoustic coating. The panels were quickly adhered to the ceiling with adhesive. Smooth-surface, direct-apply wall and ceiling panels have therefore provided superior sound absorption and design possibilities at an economical cost.

Quadrangle partners with UK-based BDP

Toronto-based design practice Quadrangle partners with UK-based BDP. Photo courtesy Quadrangle
Toronto-based design practice Quadrangle partners with UK-based BDP.
Photo courtesy Quadrangle

Canadian architecture and interior design practice Quadrangle has formed a partnership with UK-based BDP, aiming to create a platform for broadened international growth and expertise.

BDP has made a strategic investment in the Toronto-based firm. Quadrangle will lead Canadian operations and BDP’s North American expansion.

“BDP’s collective grouping of professions design with a progressive outlook and a sensibility toward the creation of a sustainable and human environment,” said John McManus, chief executive of BDP. “We are confident that our culture and ethos will be greatly enhanced by the addition of Quadrangle.”

Quadrangle is currently completing the Yonge-Sheppard Centre, a large, mixed-use development in north Toronto. Quadrangle is also working on a large-scale mixed-use development featuring retail, housing, office, and hospitality in downtown Markham, Ont.

“We are incredibly excited to join BDP,” said Anna Madeira, executive principal at Quadrangle. “This partnership infuses our business with greater expertise, services, and resources that we can offer to our clients, and it enables us to provide our staff with increased opportunities to work on diverse projects.”

BDP is currently providing full inter-disciplinary design services to restore and safeguard the future of the Palace of Westminster, the seat of the UK’s Parliament. In Toronto, BDP has designed a three-level retail podium for real estate firm RioCan at the Well, a large, mixed-use commercial development that is now under construction.

Toronto facility wins AIA honour award

Designed by Hariri Pontarini Architects, the Casey House in Toronto has won the American Institute of Architects (AIA) 2019 Institute Honor Awards for Architecture. Photo courtesy AIA
Designed by Hariri Pontarini Architects, the Casey House in Toronto has won the American Institute of Architects (AIA) 2019 Institute Honor Awards for Architecture.
Photo courtesy AIA

Designed by Hariri Pontarini Architects, the Casey House in Toronto is the recipient of the American Institute of Architects (AIA) 2019 Institute Honor Awards for Architecture.

The award celebrates the best in contemporary architecture and highlights the many ways buildings and spaces can improve lives. AIA’s nine-member jury selects submissions demonstrating design achievement, including a sense of place and purpose, ecology, environmental sustainability, and history.

Adding 5481 m2 (59,000 sf) of space to an existing heritage-designated Victorian mansion, Casey House serves as a specialized healthcare facility for those living with HIV/AIDS. The new structure embraces the 1875 mansion, nicknamed ‘the Grey Lady,’ and organizes the user experience around a landscaped courtyard, visible from every corridor and room. Over 10 years in the making, it meets the needs of its patients and their providers in a setting designed to evoke the comforts of home.

Winnipeg Chapter discusses spray foam technology

The CSC Winnipeg is having a presentation on “Spray foam for Canadian Construction”. Starting at 11:30 a.m., the event will take place on February 13, at the Viscount Gort Hotel.

At the presentation, Paul Duffy, MASc., P.Eng., principal of Paul Duffy and Associates, will share his expertise. He will cover a range of topics including spray foam technology, product attributes, code-compliant assemblies and standards, and quality assurance. He will also speak on why spray-polyurethane foam (SPF) is becoming a key tool for designers and builders looking to meet and exceed stringent building codes.

Last date to register is February 11.

For more information, click here.

Design revealed for Toronto hospital’s new 22-storey tower

A rendering of the 22-storey Patient Support Centre (PSC) at the SickKids hospital campus in Toronto. Photo courtesy B+H Architects/SickKids
A rendering of the 22-storey Patient Support Centre (PSC) at the SickKids hospital campus in Toronto.
Photo courtesy B+H Architects/SickKids

The design for the new 22-storey Patient Support Centre (PSC) on the Hospital for Sick Children (SickKids) campus in Toronto have been revealed by B+H Architects.

The design includes an undulating façade and a blue-coloured staircase encased in glass to bring physicians, nurses, hospital administration, and foundation employees together in a light-filled environment.

“The design of the new PSC provides an important architectural framework for a workplace environment designed to transform the way SickKids works,” says Patrick Fejér, senior design principal at B+H. “The PSC is being designed to create an inspiring environment that supports the needs of health-care providers, fosters collaboration, and helps to accelerate innovation.”

The PSC is the first phase of Project Horizon—the SickKids campus redevelopment plan. A café and retail atrium at the ground level opens up the corner of Elizabeth and Elm streets and activates the public realm, thereby creating a new social hub for the surrounding community. The lower floors, that will also be accessible to the public are proposed to include educational and simulation spaces, a learning institute, library, and conference centre. An enclosed pedestrian bridge establishes an integral link on the SickKids campus, connecting the Peter Gilgan Centre for Research and Learning (PGCRL) and the hospital’s main atrium.

B+H designed the tower’s façade with a degree of transparency to increase connectivity between SickKids and the community. A series of coloured horizontal fins further animates the pedestrian experience, provides shading, and optimizes thermal performance. The tower’s scale and height directly relate to its surrounding campus context and the city, while maintaining its own presence.